Texas Tech University

Committed to teaching and the advancement of knowledge, Texas Tech University, a comprehensive public research university, provides the highest standards of excellence in higher education, fosters intellectual and personal development, and stimulates meaningful research and service to humankind.

Overview of Texas Tech University

A Message from the University

Texas Tech University is a public institution that was founded in 1923. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 32,125, its setting is city, and the campus size is 1,839 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. Texas Tech University’s ranking in the 2021 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities, #217. Its in-state tuition and fees are $11,319; out-of-state tuition and fees are $23,979.

Texas Tech University is a large research institution in the college town of Lubbock. Students are required to live on campus until they have completed 30 hours of course work. The Texas Tech Red Raiders sports teams compete in the NCAA Big 12 Conference and are particularly competitive in football and basketball. Students can join more than 450 student organizations, including Texas Tech’s large Greek community, made up of about 50 fraternities and sororities. The university also runs research centers and institutes, including the National Wind Institute.



The school offers a wide variety of graduate programs, including degrees through the Jerry S. Rawls College of Business Administration, the Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering and the School of Law. Notable alumni of Texas Tech University include Ed Whitacre, former chairman and CEO of both AT&T and General Motors and the namesake of the engineering school; Grammy-nominated country singer Pat Green; and actor Brad Leland, who appeared in both the feature film and television series “Friday Night Lights.”

Message from the School

As a public research university, Texas Tech University advances knowledge through innovative and creative teaching, research and scholarship. The university is dedicated to student success by preparing learners to be ethical leaders for a diverse and globally competitive workforce. The residential college setting in Lubbock, Texas (pop. 258,862) makes for an exciting collegiate experience since the hometown of most Texas Tech students is 300 miles or farther from the Lubbock campus. The university is committed to enhancing the cultural and economic development of the state, nation and world.

Twelve colleges and schools makeup the academic areas at Texas Tech University and offer more than 150 undergraduate degrees, 100 graduate degrees, and 50 doctoral degrees. These include:

  • College of Agricultural Sciences & Natural Resources
  • College of Architecture
  • College of Arts & Sciences
  • Jerry S. Rawls College of Business Administration
  • College of Education
  • Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering
  • Honors College
  • College of Human Sciences
  • College of Media and Communication
  • J.T. & Margaret Talkington College of Visual & Performing Arts
  • Graduate School
  • School of Law

Texas Tech is among 131 universities and colleges in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education’s “Very High Research Activity” category. The University also is only one of 94 public institutions listed.




Texas Tech was created by legislative action in 1923 and has the distinction of being the largest comprehensive higher education institution in the western two-thirds of the state of Texas. The university is the major institution of higher education in a region larger than 46 of the nation’s 50 states and is the only campus in Texas that is home to a major university, law school and medical school. Originally named Texas Technological College, the college opened in 1925 with six buildings and an enrollment of 914. Graduate instruction did not begin until 1927 within the school of Liberal Arts. A “Division of Graduate Studies” was established in 1935 and eventually became known as the Graduate School in 1954. By action of the Texas State Legislature, Texas Technological College formally became Texas Tech University on September 1, 1969.

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